Accommodating students with special needs in the classroom

An inclusive classroom is staffed with a regular education teacher and a special education teacher.

The student population includes students with and without disabilities.

Tiffany Royal, a fifth grade teacher, and Joyce Duryea, a special education teacher, co-teach for part of the school day. Their school has established a new program whereby many students with high-incidence disabilities (e.g., learning disabilities, mild mental retardation, mild behavior disorders) are placed full-time into general education classrooms with support from special education teachers. Tiffany Royal describes it this way, “I really wasn't sure what I was volunteering for when the principal asked me to participate.

I guess I had confidence that it would all somehow work out, and I knew I was working with a veteran special education teacher.

Learning disabilities impact the way children are able to process and understand information; they are neurological disorders that might manifest themselves as difficulty listening, thinking, writing, speaking, spelling, or doing mathematical calculations.

Dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, dyspraxia, visual perception disorders, auditory processing disorders, and language disorders fall under the umbrella of learning disorders.

Inclusion has been a controversial topic among special and general educators (Fuchs & Fuchs 1994) and simply mentioning the word evokes strong emotions.

Inclusion is the placement of students with disabilities into the general education classroom.

If the student requires specialized services, they are provided within the general education setting.

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